Later Life and Care Planning FAQs

What is Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA)?

A Lasting Power of Attorney is a legal document which lets you (the Donor) choose someone you trust (the Attorney) to look after your affairs if you are unable to do so in the future. The attorney could make decisions relating to your finances or property or your health and welfare.

There are two types of LPA; one for Health and Welfare and one for Property and Financial Affairs

What is an Attorney, and how many can I appoint?

An Attorney is the person you appoint via a Lasting Power of Attorney to manage your affairs if you become unable to do so. You can appoint up to four attorneys.

What can an Attorney do for me?

An Attorney will manage your affairs if you become unable to do so. They should act in your best interests and comply with any directions you have left.

Does making an LPA mean that I lose control of my own finances?

A Lasting Power of Attorney does not mean that you would lose control of your finances. The attorney cannot act until you are unable to manage your affairs. At this point they would step in to help. The Attorney must always act in your best interests though.

My parents are getting elderly and a little confused. I can see their situation getting worse as the time goes by. Is there anything I can do about it?

If your parents still have mental capacity they could make a Lasting Power of Attorney in relation to Health and Welfare or Property and Financial affairs. This would allow them to plan ahead and choose who can make decisions on their behalf, if and when, they are unable to do so.